TB

TUBERCULOSIS (TB) PROJECT

 

Almost nine million people around the world become ill with tuberculosis (TB) each year. More than one-third of them fail to gain access to accurate diagnosis or effective treatment and are suffering and dying needlessly from this curable disease. Many of these people live in poverty-stricken areas and have very limited or nonexistent access to health services.
Additionally, the failure to detect so many infectious TB cases is thwarting efforts to reduce the spread of TB and eliminate it.

 

This problem cannot be solved by any single organization or country.
Therefore TB REACH under the WHO aims to increase case detection of TB, detect the disease as early as possible, and ensure timely and complete treatment while maintaining high TB cure rates. TB REACH focuses on reaching people with limited or no access to TB services and looking for innovative ways to do this.

 

In achieving these objectives, governments and civil society must strive jointly to introduce and implement innovative and ground-breaking techniques, interventions, approaches and activities that result in detecting the undetected TB cases, leading to a reduced rate of transmissions and preventing the emergence of drug-resistant forms of TB.

 

TB Mass Screening

 

Health Promotion and Development Organization (HePDO) through the wave 4 funding of the TB REACH programme received funds for mobilization of vulnerable TB communities in the Kanifing Municipal Council of the Gambia, with the objective of early detection of more TB cases, early diagnosis and treatment.

 

As part of these mobilization activities, a mass TB screening sensitization activities in the form of open field days was conducted on 23rd February – 5th March 2015 at the communities within the project intervention site (KMC).

The issues that were discussed during the Screening Session were; Signs and Symptoms of TB, Burden of TB on communities, The Role of the community members in the fight against the disease, Identification, counseling and referral of TB suspects and conducting live screening sessions.

 

NOTE: UPLOAD FEW PICTURES OF THE TB SCREENING HELD AT THE 3 COMMUNITIES

 

Training of TB Reach Volunteers at Community Level

HePDO organized one day training for their TB Reach volunteers working at communities conducting screening, counselling and referring suspects to health facilities for testing and possible commencement of treatment.  This all geared towards building the capacities of volunteers to make them understand the real signs and symptoms of Tuberculosis and how to conduct effective screening, counselling and referrals

The training was conducted on the 25th July 2015 and venue was at Tallinding Kunkujang ABC Nursery School. Resources persons were drawn from staff of Ministry of Health and Social Welfare working at chest clinics as Leprosy/TB inspectors. HePDO staff facilitated the training process.

The objectives of the training was for Participants to be able to better understand the signs and symptoms of Tuberculosis, to equip them with the required knowledge and skills to effectively and efficiently screen suspects at community level and  to know all the counselling techniques in making referrals to health facilities for testing.

 

The training was done at a time when most of the volunteers needed to be refreshed on the work they are doing and as such they felt it was done at the right moment and right time. The turnout of participants and level of participation showed that they are willing and committed to be TB Reach volunteers at community level.

 

NOTE: UPLOAD PICTURES OF TB TRAINING

 

MONITORING VISIT TO THE TB REACH

The TB REACH under the WHO aims to increase case detection of TB, detect the disease as early as possible, and ensure timely and complete treatment while maintaining high TB cure rates. TB REACH focuses on reaching people with limited or no access to TB services and looking for innovative ways to do this.

In achieving these objectives, governments and civil society must strive jointly to introduce and implement innovative and ground-breaking techniques, interventions, approaches and activities that result in detecting the undetected TB cases, leading to a reduced rate of transmissions and preventing the emergence of drug-resistant forms of TB.

Having said that, Health Promotion and Development Organization (HePDO) as a local NGO through the wave 4 funding of the TB REACH programme received funds for mobilization of vulnerable TB communities in the Kanifing Municipal Council of the Gambia, with the objective of early detection of more TB cases, early diagnosis and treatment.

As part of these project activities which has been going on since October 2014, a monitoring visit was conducted to the project beneficiary communities and implementation facilities for the first quarter of the year 2015 (January – March 2015).

This Monitoring activities and program were conducted by some of the project staffs at HePDO and staffs of the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP), from the 5th to 6th May 2015.   This gave the monitoring team the opportunity to visit health facilities (the testing centers), and the community volunteers, and the TB leprosy inspectors so as to verify data in the registers at the health facilities and as well as to discuss the way forwards.

The objectives of this monitoring visit were:

  • To visit all the chest clinics in KMC and review their data and records.
  • To discuss with the lab technicians and Leprosy and Tuberculosis(LTIs) the challenges they face and the way forward
  • To visit all the TB active case search volunteers in the communities benefitting from the TB REACH project within KMC, review their records, discuss with them the challenges they face and the way forward.

 

METHODOLOGY

A monitoring checklist was developed to guide the monitoring team during the process. A range of multidimensional approaches such as open discussions, presentation, demonstration, and experience sharing were used in order to gather information on the activities being implemented in the communities. The checklist developed contain questions and recommendations which focused on finding out the achievements made, the challenges/constrains faced, and the way forward.

For the monitoring team to collect the data realistically, a random selection of the beneficiary communities was done, and six (6) were selected out of the eighteen (18). In each of these six selected communities, two (2) community volunteers were also selected to be visited. However, all the testing centres and their staff were visited.

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